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About MO onAir

This Missouri onAir hub supports its citizens to become more informed about and engaged in federal and state politics while facilitating more civil and positive discussions with their representatives, candidates, and fellow Missourians.

  • Missouri onAir is one of 50 state governance and elections hubs that the US onAir Network is providing to reinvigorate our imperiled democracy.
  • Virginia onAir is US onAir’s model of how a state’s onAir Council and curators can enhance a state Hub with fresh Top News and state legislature content, moderated discussions, and production of zoom aircasts with committees, interviews and debates with candidates, and presentations.

For more information  about the many opportunities to learn about and engage with this Missouri onAir hub, go to this US onAir post on the US onAir central hub.

Our two minute vision video about the US onAir network is below.

Streaming onAir

Missouri government livestreams

https://www.mo.gov/government/legislative-branch/

Upcoming Livestreams
None scheduled

Recent livestreams:

Senate Committee aircasts

These aircasts will be focused on the recent activities of House committees during the 2021 General Assembly. Committee chairs will host these aircasts with members of their committees and their invited audience.

Aircasts are Zoom meetings with a host, featured guests, and an online audience livestreamed to the public and archived as YouTube videos in this Hub and YouTube channel.

Here is an example an aircast on a state committee (Virginia).

House Committee aircasts

These aircasts will be focused on the recent activities of House committees during the 2021 General Assembly. Committee chairs will host these aircasts with members of their committees and their invited audience.

Aircasts are Zoom meetings with a host, featured guests, and an online audience livestreamed to the public and archived as YouTube videos in this Hub and YouTube channel.

Here is an example an aircast on a state committee (Virginia).

About the US onAir Network
June 6, 2021 (02:00)

Missouri News

Democrats demand LGBTQ exhibit return to Missouri Capitol or other exhibits be removed
Missouri Independent, JASON HANCOCKSeptember 8, 2021 (Short)

If an LGBTQ history exhibit was removed from the Missouri Capitol because it didn’t get pre-approval from a specific board, then every exhibit on display that didn’t get approved must also be removed, House Minority Leader Crystal Quade argued in a letter to state officials on Wednesday.

That would mean, she said, that there would be no exhibits on display.

In the letter addressed to Dru Buntin, director of the Department of Natural Resources, Quade says Gov. Mike Parson’s explanation for why the display was removed was a lie.

Parson said the exhibit was taken down after he received complaints and because it wasn’t approved for display by the board of public buildings. However, the board’s meeting minutes going back five years show it has never discussed museum exhibits, and the former museum director said in 24 years he never had to seek approval from the board regarding exhibits.

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway announces she won’t run for re-election in 2022
Missouri Independent, Jason Hancock June 4, 2021 (Short)

Nicole Galloway, the only Democrat who currently holds a statewide office in Missouri, announced Friday she won’t seek re-election in 2022.

In an announcement posted on Twitter, Galloway called serving as auditor “the honor of my life.” She pointed to her husband and three sons, noting that in her decade in public office she has “missed countless family events, little league games and school activities.

“I am ready for the next chapter of service and life with my family.”

Galloway is a Columbia CPA who was appointed auditor by Gov. Jay Nixon in 2015 after the death of Republican Tom Schweich. She won a full term in office in 2018, even as Democratic U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill lost to Republican Josh Hawley.

Missouri lawmakers passed a tax credit program to fund school choice. How will it work?
Missouri Independent, Tessa WeinbergJune 2, 2021 (Short)

Questions persist about how the program will function as lawmakers await whether Gov. Mike Parson will sign or veto the legislation

Missouri is on the cusp of creating a program that directs donations funded by tax credits to help parents offset the cost of sending their kids to private school.

Lawmakers laid out the parameters of the program, like who qualifies and where they must reside. But weeks after school choice advocates scored their historic legislative victory, questions persist about how the program will actually work if the bill is signed by Gov. Mike Parson.

Has Missouri hit the transportation funding threshold that triggers the program’s start? Can eligible students use funds to transfer to public schools outside of their district? And how soon will the nonprofits be finalized, rules for applying be set and the program be up and running?

 

2021 Legislature

Numerous Bills Approved by the General Assembly Became Law on August 28
Hannibal Courier-Post, Louis Riggs, Missouri State Representative 5th DistrictAugust 30, 2021 (Long)

The Missouri General Assembly had a highly productive legislative session and now the bulk of the bills passed by lawmakers and signed by the governor are set to become law on August 28. The bills that are now set to become law address some of the state’s most pressing issues such as the protection of children and vulnerable Missourians, as well as support for veterans and law enforcement.

In total, the Missouri House and Senate approved 69 pieces of legislation during the 2021 legislative session. That number is up from the 2020 legislative session when the General Assembly gave final approval to 51 bills, but down from 2019 when 92 bills made it across the legislative finish line. Forty pieces of legislation originating in the House received final legislative approval. Eighteen of the bills are appropriations bills that make up the state operating budget. The Senate saw 29 of its bills cross the finish line before session ended on May 14.

Of the bills he received, Gov. Parson vetoed three House Bills, and one Senate Bill. He also made line-item vetoes in 12 of the 18 appropriations bills. The legislature will return on September 15 for its annual Veto Session. During Veto Session, legislators have a final opportunity to enact their ideas into law despite the governor’s objections. In both chambers, a two-thirds vote is required to override a veto. In the House that amounts to 109 votes. Twenty-three votes are needed in the Senate to successfully complete an override motion.

To view a complete list of bills going into law by effective date, please visit: https://house.mo.gov/newbillreport.aspx?year=2021&code=R&select=evergroupcode:1&sortoptions=effectivedate

Missouri lawmakers passed a tax credit program to fund school choice. How will it work?
Missouri Independent, Tessa WeinbergJune 2, 2021 (Short)

Questions persist about how the program will function as lawmakers await whether Gov. Mike Parson will sign or veto the legislation

Missouri is on the cusp of creating a program that directs donations funded by tax credits to help parents offset the cost of sending their kids to private school.

Lawmakers laid out the parameters of the program, like who qualifies and where they must reside. But weeks after school choice advocates scored their historic legislative victory, questions persist about how the program will actually work if the bill is signed by Gov. Mike Parson.

Has Missouri hit the transportation funding threshold that triggers the program’s start? Can eligible students use funds to transfer to public schools outside of their district? And how soon will the nonprofits be finalized, rules for applying be set and the program be up and running?

 

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Missouri. The bicameral General Assembly is composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Members of both houses of the General Assembly are subject to term limits. Senators are limited to two four-year terms and representatives to four two-year terms, a total of 8 years for members of both houses.

The General Assembly meets at the Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City.

Voting in Missouri

Top Missouri election official wants ban on helping voters fix absentee ballot mistakes
The Kansas City Star, JONATHAN SHORMANSeptember 1, 2021 (Short)

Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft wants the General Assembly to ban local election workers from helping voters correct mistakes on absentee ballots, a change that could keep some votes from being counted.

The request adds to a growing list of measures advanced by Republicans to alter the state’s election laws, including restoring rules requiring voters to show a photo ID and making it harder to amend the state constitution through ballot measures. Lawmakers failed to pass most proposals earlier this year, but proponents are signaling they will try again in 2022.

The proposals come as GOP legislators indulge lingering conspiracy theories surrounding the 2020 presidential election. Missouri Republicans are also keen on curbing Democrats’ success at passing progressive policies through statewide votes. Medicaid expansion, medical marijuana and minimum wage increases have all been approved by voters in recent years.

Federal & state elections on the ballot: US Senator, 8 US House members, and State Senate and House members

Ballot measures:

The Missouri Elections & Voting, part of the Secretary of State, oversees all Missouri elections.

2022 Elections

Missouri lawmakers discuss election security in hearing marked by conspiracy theories
Missouri Independant, REBECCA RIVASAugust 25, 2021 (Long)

The Missouri House Elections Committee convened Tuesday to discuss ways to alter the initiative petition process and improve election security.

And over the course of more than three hours, lawmakers heard a parade of debunked conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.

“I’m convinced the country suffered the greatest cyber attack in the history of the world that was ordered and orchestrated by the Chinese Communist Party,” retired military analyst David Stevens told the committee.

Stevens was referencing a conspiracy peddled by MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell that claims the Chinese were behind President Joe Biden’s 2020 victory. During his August symposium, Lindell offered $5 million to any cyber security expert who could prove his claims wrong, which at least one former military cyber expert, a longtime Republican from Texas, has said he easily can.

Others testifying Tuesday were similarly enamored with Lindell’s theories, including Rep. Ann Kelly, a Lamar Republican who doesn’t serve on the elections committee but testified about attending a symposium in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, organized by Lindell.

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway announces she won’t run for re-election in 2022
Missouri Independent, Jason Hancock June 4, 2021 (Short)

Nicole Galloway, the only Democrat who currently holds a statewide office in Missouri, announced Friday she won’t seek re-election in 2022.

In an announcement posted on Twitter, Galloway called serving as auditor “the honor of my life.” She pointed to her husband and three sons, noting that in her decade in public office she has “missed countless family events, little league games and school activities.

“I am ready for the next chapter of service and life with my family.”

Galloway is a Columbia CPA who was appointed auditor by Gov. Jay Nixon in 2015 after the death of Republican Tom Schweich. She won a full term in office in 2018, even as Democratic U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill lost to Republican Josh Hawley.

Covid-19

COVID cases among children rising as Missouri Delta variant wave enters fifth month
Missouri Independent, RUDI KELLERSeptember 1, 2021 (Short)

Clay LaRue, superintendent of the Van Buren R-1 School District, made a tough decision Sunday.

With COVID-19 cases spiking in Carter County in southeast Missouri, and many of those infections among very young children, LaRue shut down the district’s pre-kindergarten program for two weeks. He had previously directed faculty, staff and students to wear masks as of Friday.

There were 35 active cases among students and staff and 133 in quarantine as of Tuesday morning. Attendance in elementary grades, he said, is about 66 to 68 percent.

LaRue is worried that if cases continue to increase, he will have to stop in-person instruction for other students as well.

“We are very concerned,” LaRue said in an interview Tuesday with The Independent. “That was an email I sent to my board yesterday, that if this continues…today is our third day in masks, and hopefully that has slowed down spread and mitigated some of the spread.”

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